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October 15, 2021

Edith Bolling Galt Wilson

October 15, 1872

Edith Bolling Galt Wilson — Born October 15, 1872 (Wytheville, VA). Died December 28, 1961 (Washington, D.C.).

Edith Bolling Galt WilsonWhite House Years: 1915-1921

  • Edith Wilson was introduced to President Wilson after his first wife, Ellen, died by Wilson’s cousin Helen Woodrow Bones.
  • Edith Wilson set an example for rationing during WWI when she hosted “gasless Sundays,” “meatless Mondays,” and “wheatless Wednesdays” in the White House. She used sheep to mow the White House lawn and auctioned their wool for the American Red Cross.
  • Edith Wilson was asked to name battleships and chose Native American names in honor of her heritage as a descendent of Pocahontas.
  • When Woodrow Wilson had a stroke towards the end of his presidency in 1919, Edith Wilson stepped in for him, and took care of routine duties and details while she passed off larger responsibilities to the different department heads. She has been referred to as the “Secret President”.
  • Woodrow Wilson died shortly after his presidency in 1924, but Edith Wilson lived until 1961, and she even rode in John F. Kennedy’s inaugural parade.

Quote:

I studied every paper, sent from different Secretaries or Senators, and tried to digest and present in tabloid form the things that, despite my vigilance, had to go to the President. I, myself, never made a single decision regarding the disposition of public affairs. The only decision that was mine was what was important and what was not, and the very important decision of when to present matters to my husband.

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2021-10-15 2021-10-15 America/Detroit Edith Bolling Galt Wilson Edith Bolling Galt Wilson — Born October 15, 1872 (Wytheville, VA). Died December 28, 1961 (Washington, D.C.). White House Years: 1915-1921 Edith Wilson was introduced to President Wilson after his first wife, Ellen, died by Wilson’s cousin Helen Woodrow Bones. Edith Wilson set an example for rationing during WWI when she hosted “gasless Sundays,” “meatless Mondays,” and “wheatless Wednesdays” in the White House. She used sheep to mow the White House lawn and auctioned their wool for the American Red Cross. Edith Wilson was asked to name battleships and chose Native American names in honor of her heritage as a descendent of Pocahontas. When Woodrow Wilson had a stroke towards the end of his presidency in 1919, Edith Wilson stepped in for him, and took care of routine duties and details while she passed off larger responsibilities to the different department heads. She has been referred to as the “Secret President”. Woodrow Wilson died shortly after his presidency in 1924, but Edith Wilson lived until 1961, and she even rode in John F. Kennedy’s inaugural parade. Quote: “I studied every paper, sent from different Secretaries or Senators, and tried to digest and present in tabloid form the things that, despite my vigilance, had to go to the President. I, myself, never made a single decision regarding the disposition of public affairs. The only decision that was mine was what was important and what was not, and the very important decision of when to present matters to my husband.” ----

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